USS Orion

Welcome to the USS Orion!

The USS Orion is a Galaxy-Class starship which proudly serves during the year 2395. We are assigned to the area of Federation space near the Federation/Romulan border. Her mission is to bridge relations with several Romulan factions, promote peace through Federation strength and investigate an unexplored border region.

We are a 13+ rated sim set in the prime Star Trek universe. We are a sim that tries to stay true to what The Next Generation and Deep Space Nine brought to our TV screens. We are a character-driven simulation that focuses on the personal stories and bonds between us.

Task Force 72 Silver Unit of Merit (March 2018).
Task Force 72 Silver Unit of Merit (August 2018).

If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to join us on Discord today!


Latest News Items

» StarDate: Moon and Regulus

Posted on Fri Oct 5th, 2018 @ 7:23am by Commander Logan Barrett in StarDate

A star that’s a popular location for mythologists old and new leads the Moon into the sky early tomorrow.

Regulus represents the heart of Leo, the lion. The bright star will stand to the upper right of the crescent Moon at first light.

Regulus is a system of at least four stars. But only one of them is visible to the unaided eye. It is bigger, heavier, and brighter than the Sun. And it’s a whisker less than 80 light-years away. That’s quite close on the astronomical scale.

Regulus is not just bright. It also lies quite near the ecliptic, which is the Sun’s path across the sky. Bright stars on the ecliptic held a special significance for many ancient cultures. So the stars were given powerful names, and they held important positions in skylore.

In Babylon, for example, Regulus was known as the king. In India, it was “the mighty.” And in ancient Persia, it was one of the four “royal” stars — the guardians of heaven. Each star controlled a quadrant of the night sky. And Regulus was the leader of the gang, giving it power over the entire sky.

Regulus is a popular spot for modern mythmakers, too — the people who create science fiction. The star has been featured in several Star Trek series, for example, and in several video games. And in Babylon 5, a 1990s TV series, it was home to the first human colony beyond the solar system.

So the heart of the lion remains a popular setting for big stories.



StarDate debuted in 1978, making it the longest-running national radio science feature in the country. It airs on more than 300 radio stations.

StarDate tells listeners what to look for in the night sky, and explains the science, history, and skylore behind these objects. It also keeps listeners up to date on the latest research findings and space missions. And it offers tidbits on astronomy in the arts and popular culture, providing ways for people with diverse interests to keep up with the universe.

StarDate is a production of The University of Texas McDonald Observatory.

StarDate.org

Commander Logan Barrett
Commanding Officer, USS Orion


» StarDate: Mercury Bound

Posted on Thu Oct 4th, 2018 @ 7:44am by Commander Logan Barrett in StarDate

Heading for Mercury

Getting to Mercury isn’t easy. The next mission to the Sun’s closest planet will need seven years to arrive and enter orbit. And to achieve that orbit, it’ll have to fly past Earth once, Venus twice, and Mercury six times.

BepiColombo is scheduled for launch later this month. The mission is a joint project of Europe and Japan. It’s named for Giuseppe Colombo, a scientist who studied Mercury and worked on Europe’s mission to Comet Halley.

The mission will consist of two spacecraft. They’ll travel to Mercury together, shuttled by a sort of space-going Uber that’s powered by ion engines. When they get to the planet, the two craft will enter separate orbits. One will study Mercury’s composition and structure. The other will study its magnetic field and how the field interacts with the solar wind.

Only two spacecraft have visited Mercury. Mariner 10 flew past it three times in the 1970s. And Messenger orbited Mercury from 2011 to 2015. BepiColombo will build on their work, helping scientists piece together the history of Mercury. And that will help them understand how all of the Sun’s rocky planets were born.

Reaching Mercury is tough because a craft has to fight against the gravitational pull of the Sun. Each of BepiColombo’s planetary encounters will help it put on the brakes, and approach Mercury at the right angle. If everything goes well, the craft will ease into orbit in December of 2025.



StarDate debuted in 1978, making it the longest-running national radio science feature in the country. It airs on more than 300 radio stations.

StarDate tells listeners what to look for in the night sky, and explains the science, history, and skylore behind these objects. It also keeps listeners up to date on the latest research findings and space missions. And it offers tidbits on astronomy in the arts and popular culture, providing ways for people with diverse interests to keep up with the universe.

StarDate is a production of The University of Texas McDonald Observatory.

StarDate.org

Commander Logan Barrett
Commanding Officer, USS Orion


» StarDate: Hangin' Around

Posted on Thu Oct 4th, 2018 @ 7:42am by Commander Logan Barrett in StarDate

The space close to Earth is getting crowded. It’s filling up with spacecraft, old rocket stages, and lots of other debris.

The space a million miles behind Earth is getting crowded, too. It’s filling up with space telescopes.

That point is known as L2. The gravity of Earth and the Sun are balanced there. So any spacecraft that goes there stays there. It’s a good spot for telescopes because their view isn’t blocked by Earth. They can be kept cooler there, too. That allows them to study some of the coldest objects in the universe.

In the last decade or so, several observatories have been sent to L2. That includes Gaia, a European craft that’s plotting the positions of more than a billion stars.

Several more observatories are scheduled to head that way soon. The biggest is James Webb Space Telescope — the biggest and most expensive space telescope ever built. It’ll study the infrared sky, so it needs to get away from the glowing Earth. Launch is planned for 2021.

A Russian craft will head for L2 next spring. Known as SRG, it’ll study galaxy clusters and map the structure of the universe. It’ll also look for black holes and the remnants of exploded stars.

And another European mission, Euclid, will join the others in 2021. It’s designed to study dark energy and dark matter. It’ll look toward intergalactic space — with no Earth to block the view.

We’ll talk about a craft that’ll go even farther tomorrow.



StarDate debuted in 1978, making it the longest-running national radio science feature in the country. It airs on more than 300 radio stations.

StarDate tells listeners what to look for in the night sky, and explains the science, history, and skylore behind these objects. It also keeps listeners up to date on the latest research findings and space missions. And it offers tidbits on astronomy in the arts and popular culture, providing ways for people with diverse interests to keep up with the universe.

StarDate is a production of The University of Texas McDonald Observatory.

StarDate.org

Commander Logan Barrett
Commanding Officer, USS Orion


» StarDate: Panoptes

Posted on Tue Oct 2nd, 2018 @ 5:54pm by Commander Logan Barrett in StarDate

The most successful technique for finding planets in other star systems is known as the transit method. Astronomers watch for a star to fade a tiny bit as a planet passes in front of it. The method finds planets only in star systems with the right geometry. Even so, it’s yielded thousands of discoveries.

And it doesn’t require big telescopes to work. In fact, small telescopes are better for the job. They can watch a larger patch of sky, improving the odds of seeing a transit. And astronomers have built networks of small telescopes just for transit observations.

One that’s just getting rolling uses off-the-shelf cameras and lenses. And it’s designed for the public to participate. Using instructions provided by the project, volunteers can set up their own units for about $5,000.

PANOPTES got started in 2010, with a single camera in Hawaii. Project leaders tested the design. They also worked out ways to control the network, collect and process the observations, and make the data available to others.

Today, about a dozen PANOPTES units are under construction in the U.S. and other countries. And the goal is to add about 10 per year. They’ll be built around the world, providing coverage of the entire sky.

The project plans to support a planet-hunting space telescope known as TESS. PANOPTES observations can help confirm TESS discoveries and provide more information about the planets — big science from little packages.



StarDate debuted in 1978, making it the longest-running national radio science feature in the country. It airs on more than 300 radio stations.

StarDate tells listeners what to look for in the night sky, and explains the science, history, and skylore behind these objects. It also keeps listeners up to date on the latest research findings and space missions. And it offers tidbits on astronomy in the arts and popular culture, providing ways for people with diverse interests to keep up with the universe.

StarDate is a production of The University of Texas McDonald Observatory.

StarDate.org

Commander Logan Barrett
Commanding Officer, USS Orion


» September Honorable Post Mention

Posted on Mon Oct 1st, 2018 @ 8:20am by Commander Logan Barrett in General News

September Honorable Post Mention:
"Security Precautions"

Congratulations on this awesome post which has some really great dialogue between security and intelligence!

"Correct, an absence of evidence doesn't disprove a theory, ensign, but it isn't confirmation of a theory either. Without proof, all we have are theories; And Starfleet Intelligence doesn't make it's recommendations based on hunches or guesswork..." - Ensign Tiberius Augusta

Lieutenant Junior Grade Ozanna Isuri
Chief Security/Tactical Officer, USS Orion


Ensign Tiberius Augusta
Intelligence Officer, USS Orion



Commander Logan Barrett
Commanding Officer, USS Orion


Latest Mission Posts

» Keep Your Friends Close, Part 2

Mission: Mission 1: Unscheduled Madness
Posted on Wed Oct 10th, 2018 @ 3:48pm by Ensign Tiberius Augusta & Commander Logan Barrett

Barrett was in his ready room going over the latest reports from engineering. They looked like they were getting ready to try some experiments in an effort to free the ship. He was hoping that something would work soon. This whole detour from their original mission was weighing on him.…


» Keeping Friends Close Part: 1

Mission: Mission 1: Unscheduled Madness
Posted on Wed Oct 10th, 2018 @ 3:48pm by Ensign Tiberius Augusta

[As we know, Starfleet officers are not allowed to romantically fraternise with subordinate officers who report directly to them, intelligence officers even more so. The partners and spouses of intelligence officers have to go through extensive vetting before a romantic relationship can be undertaken with full disclosure and even then,…


» A Different Perspective

Mission: Mission 1: Unscheduled Madness
Posted on Sat Oct 6th, 2018 @ 10:11am by Sub Lieutenant Vriha t'Ehhelih & Lieutenant Eilaea t'Keirianh

Eilaea glared at the PADD in her hand, the other hand setting down the half-empty cup of tea and grasping a fork with a piece of the human food she was currently sampling on it; an odd slice of bread covered in cheese, meat, and sauce which the replicator had…


» Blinding Them With Science

Mission: Mission 1: Unscheduled Madness
Posted on Sat Oct 6th, 2018 @ 10:10am by Lieutenant Varina Hightower & Lieutenant Daynah Ral & Lieutenant JG Ozanna Isuri & Ensign Tiberius Augusta & Lieutenant Commander Nokomis Diza & Sub Lieutenant Vriha t'Ehhelih

Daynah with Lieutenant t'Ehhelih's help had arrived at Sick Bay. In tow was two carts which contained all of the various equipment needed from the Science Labs to run the tests on the first volunteers. Daynah knew that no matter what the results were they would be inconclusive until she…


» Powerless

Mission: Mission 1: Unscheduled Madness
Posted on Sun Sep 30th, 2018 @ 8:06pm by Lieutenant Eilaea t'Keirianh & Lieutenant Delothian Miazami & Lieutenant JG Bethany O'Malley

Compared to any other ship Eilaea had ever served aboard, main engineering aboard the Orion had a clear, stark difference the moment she had entered: The space itself was taller and larger in comparison, owing to the need to accommodate the matter/antimatter reactor core that dominated it, in contrast to…